November 24 Stop Israel’s War on Gaza: National Demonstration Assemble Downing St 12 noon

November 24 Stop Israel’s War on Gaza: National Demonstration Assemble Downing St 12 noon.

Hennessy Youngman on Grad School

Commodity Drawing School starts Saturday 6th October

No previous drawing experience necessary! please email freefreeschool@gmail.com for more details…

Art and Education Forum starts 26th Sept

Following the Exmouth Arms Talking Shops in May and June you are warmly invited to come along to the Autumn meetings on the last Wednesday of the month starting next week 26th September (see dates and address below.) Each meeting will be structured round 3 speakers with half hour each for presentation and discussion.

How can we take a more active stance within art education in response to recent and imminent changes with the restructuring, cuts and job losses that come in their wake? These seem to have caught us on the back foot with an apparent schism between theoretical radicalism and our ability to act collectively. Our aim is to establish a forum to encourage communication and solidarity between those working across the various sectors of art education, in order to increase our confidence to act and speak within these different contexts. The monthly meetings are intended to open up a space in which to promote exchanges increasing awareness what is going on across the sector, foster new allegiances and suggest strategies for resistance and reassertion of our collective responsibility for art education. Promoting the intrinsic value of art in schools, colleges and universities, and defending art as a subject of study available to all is central to our concerns as are working conditions and workplace democracy conducive to the best art education.

Issues to be addressed :

– Implications of the for-profit sector in education

– Working conditions for art teachers and the role of the unions

– Teachers’ agency in what and how they teach

– The operation of educational and occupational standards setting bodies and private exam boards

– Current intensification of the issues of who will be able to participate in art education and making

– Widening participation and refusal of conformity and exclusion in art education

– Art education as a critical and contesting force

Autumn dates

Upstairs at the Exmouth Arms, 1 Starcross St, Euston, NW1 2HR. http://goo.gl/maps/Roh7O

6.30 – 8.00pm

Wednesday 26 September
Wednesday 31 October
Wednesday 28 November

NEXT MEETING

Wednesday 26 September, 6.30pm:
Neil Chapman will talk about a couple of cases where institutional policy has had a detrimental effect on teaching and employment, focusing on relations between bureaucracy and teaching communities in Higher Education. For discussion he will propose how these cases might be addressed and ask how our art education community could work to help with this.

Andrew Cooper will talk about recent curriculum changes in the school in East London where he works as an art teacher; overcoming obstacles to solidarity; and how we can make art practice, art education and discourses around these, part of a movement that takes into account its own reproduction as part of the struggle.

Christabel Harley will talk about the Art and Design Widening Participation programme she developed with Jane Hagger, over a number of years of working closely between Central St Martins and local secondary schools.

(Im)possible School with Five Years

A discussion around the open submission project (Im)possible School Book: as found

DIAGRAM RESEARCH, USE AND GENERATION GROUP EVENT

DRUGG – OPEN SYMPOSIUM

Pearson Lecture Theatre, Pearson Building, UCL, London

14th and 15th July, 10-5pm

Continue reading

EXMOUTH

ARMS

TALKING

SHOP

                                                       Upstairs at the Exmouth Arms

                                                                    1 Starcross Street, Euston, NW1 2HR

                                                               6.30- 8.30pm

                                                        Wednesday 30th May 2012

We are good at describing the malaise, and texts from radical thought loom large on reading lists and in seminar discussions, but recent and imminent changes in education with the restructuring, cuts and job losses that come in their wake seem to have caught us on the back foot with an apparent schism between theoretical radicalism and our ability to act collectively.

How can we take a more active stance in relation to art and education and build on different initiatives from colleges and activist groups responding to the current politics of art and education? The monthly Exmouth Arms talking shops are intended to open up a space in which to formulate arguments and promote exchanges between institutions and interest groups to hopefully foster new allegiances and suggest strategies for resistance and reasserting shared responsibility.

Instrumentalism, student as customer, the for-profit sector in Higher Education, the future of foundation courses, art in schools, art teacher education, intern culture, the role of the unions, acceleration of neo-liberal agendas, corporate permeation in the arts ….

The evening will be structured around four or five informal presentations: up-dates, polemics, proposals for actions, testing ideas, calls for collaboration… and discussion.

OPEN TO ALL: Please come early to avoid disappointment! Small donation towards room hire gratefully received.

For further information or if you are interested in speaking please contact: Margot m.bannerman@csm.arts.ac.uk or Corinna corinnatill@gmail.com

No To NATO

Open call from the Communist Gallery

we have all been pretty busy with our own projects/jobs recently so there has been little free school activity.  however we are still doing stuff so if you are interested get in touch.  in the meantime here is a call-out from the communist gallery, that shares several members with the free school…

(view as a pdf)

It seemed that you couldn’t keep a good symbol down.

At the start of the 1980s when the ideas that would coalesce into V for Vendetta were springing up from a summer of anti-Thatcher riots across the UK coupled with a worrying surge from the far-right National Front, Guy Fawkes’ status as a potential revolutionary hero seemed to be oddly confirmed by circumstances surrounding the comic strip’s creation: it was the strip’s artist, David Lloyd, who had initially suggested using the Guy Fawkes mask as an emblem for our one-man-against-a-fascist-state lead character.

When this notion was enthusiastically received, he decided to buy one of the commonplace cardboard Guy Fawkes masks that were always readily available from mid-autumn, just to use as convenient reference.

To our great surprise, it turned out that this was the year (perhaps understandably after such an incendiary summer) when the Guy Fawkes mask was to be phased out in favour of green plastic Frankenstein monsters geared to the incoming celebration of an American Halloween.

It was also the year in which the term “Guy Fawkes Night” seemingly disappeared from common usage, to be replaced by the less provocative ‘bonfire night’.

At the time, we both remarked upon how interesting it was that we should have taken up the image right at the point where it was apparently being purged from the annals of English iconography. It seemed that you couldn’t keep a good symbol down. ”

Alan Moore, bearded magus,Albion’s Wizard in Extraordinary

 

(members of the Polish parliament don V masks recently in protest at economic, repressive copyright & web intrusion laws and other measures. V is no longer just for the street activist)